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AQUALM: Exploring Qualitative Longitudinal Research

Date - Wednesday, 11th June 2014 (10:30 am - 4:30 pm)


Course leader & contact details
Professor Bren Neale b.neale@leeds.ac.uk 07817 020 594

Any other teaching/demonstrating staff
Dr. Sarah Irwin; Dr Nick Emmel; Ruth Patrick

Date of session
11th June 2014

Time
10.30-4.30(arrival and coffee from 10am)

Venue
University of York – Wentworth College W/222

Description of course
This advanced workshop will explore the challenges and potential for adding time into the mix of a qualitative study. Sessions will include presentations on temporal theory and methodology, access and sampling, temporal ethics, and the secondary analysis of qualitative longitudinal data. Group workshops will cover the generation of QL data and ethical literacy in QL research. Students will have an opportunity to design a QL study using the knowledge gained during the day.

Target audience & any previous experience required
Doctoral students/ researchers considering or planning to use QL methods

No of places available
30

Information about teaching staff
The course is being run by members of the Timescapes team. Information about the staff and teaching resources (a series of QL methods guides) are available on the Timescapes website (www.timescapes.leeds.ac.uk).

Enquiry contact details
e.coati@leeds.ac.uk or Debbie.haverstock@york.ac.uk

More Information:

White Rose Doctoral Training Centre: Advanced Qualitative Methods Programme.

Exploring Qualitative Longitudinal Research

A one day workshop at the University of York, Wentworth College, W/222

Wednesday June 11th 10-00- 4.30pm.

This workshop will explore the potential for and challenges of adding time into the mix of a qualitative study. Sessions will include presentations on temporal theory and methodology, access and sampling, temporal ethics, and the secondary analysis of qualitative longitudinal data. Group workshops will explore the generation of QL data and ethical literacy in QL research. Delegates will have an opportunity to design a QL study using the knowledge gained during the day. The workshop is suitable for student and researchers considering or planning to use QL methods in their research. it will be delivered by Qʟ researchers from the School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of ʟeeds

Programme

10.00- 10.30:  Registration and coffee.

10.30-11.15:

Adding Time into the Mix: An introduction to Qualitative ʟongitudinal Research. Bren Neale.

11.15- 12ː

Workshop 1: Generating temporal insights in the field.  Bren ɴeale.

12 – 12.45ː ʟunchː  vouchers in your packs for the cafeteria on the ground floor

12.45- 1.45

Access, Sampling and ʀetention in Qʟ ʀesearch. ɴick Emmel

1.45-2.45

Workshop 2ː Ethics in Research Relationships over Time  ʀuth Patrick

2.45-3pmː Tea Break

3.00-3.45pm

Context, comparison and Analysis in QL Research. Sarah Irwin

3.45- 4.30

Workshop 3ː Designing Qualitative ʟongitudinal ʀesearch. Bren ɴeale.

 

Abstracts for Presentations and Ethics Workshopː

Adding Time into the Mixː an introduction to Qualitative longitudinal ʀesearch Bren Neale

This introductory session will set out the contours of Qʟ enquiry and explore what it means to add time into the mix of a qualitative study. Time can be understood in two waysː as the medium through which we carry out an enquiry, bringing a range of methodological and ethical challenges to research design, and as a theoretical concept and substantive topic that drives the generation and analysis of data. Different ways of ‘slicing’ time –  past-present-future, biography-history, intensive-extensive – will be outlined and ways of ‘capturing’ and working with time in a Qʟ study will be demonstrated. This will include the use of Framework to condense temporal data and work iteratively across cases, themes and waves. Conceptually, the session will enable a greater appreciation of time as the lynchpin through which to understand the dynamic relationship between individual agency and broader social structuresˑ and hence to reach a greater understanding of the factors that shape varied life course trajectories.

Readingː

Neale, B. and Flowerdew, J.(2003) ‘Time, Texture and Childhood: The contours of longitudinal qualitative research’ International Journal of Social Research Methodology. 6 (3) 189-199

Timescapes Methods ɢuide Series no.1: Intro to QL research www.timescapes.leeds.ac.uk/resources    

Access, sampling, and retention in qualitative longitudinal research  Nick Emmel

Qualitative ʟongitudinal (QL) research presents particular challenges in negotiating access, choosing cases, and maintaining our relationships with participants through research. In addition, because QL research engages with time methodologically and substantively, we are obliged to think about and respond to the dynamic relationships between researchers and researched, and the ways in which the subjects in our research design and determine their responses to the changing natural, social, and practical circumstances in which they live.

This session will consider how time affects the recruitment and engagement with a sample. It will consider how change (and continuity) through time provide important opportunities for description, interpretation and explanation from our research. I will focus attention on ‘subjects in process’ together with ‘relations in process’. 

Readingː

Emmel, N. (2013) Sampling and choosing cases in qualitative research: A realist approach. London, SAGE. 

Context, Comparison and Analysis in QL Research. Dr. Sarah Irwin

In this presentation I will explore evidence and findings from some different QL project,s through involvement both as a secondary, as well as a primary, researcher. I will reflect on the importance of the embeddedness of data, and strategies for working with and enabling analytic conversations across disparate QL data sets. I wil also offer some reflections on QL analysis in research on education and social inequalities.

Reading:

Winterton, M. and Irwin, S. (2012) ‘Teenage expectations of going to university: the ebb and flow of influences from 14 to 18’, J. of Youth Studies  15 (7)

Second Workshop: ‘Ethics in research relationships over time’ Ruth Patrick

This session will explore and discuss the particular ethical challenges implicit to research relationships in Qualitative Longitudinal research. Following a brief outline and overview of key issues and literature in this field, the workshop will provide an opportunity to think through the sorts of ethical challenges and dilemmas that can be encountered in QLR. Small group work will provide an informal setting, and participants are encouraged to come to the session with any examples of ethical dilemmas they have themselves encountered in their own research practices.

Reading:

Neale, B (2013) ‘Adding Time into the Mix: the Ethics of Qualitative Longitudinal research’. Methodological Innovations Online. Special issue on Research Ethics in Challenging Contexts. Eds Rose Wiles and Janet Boddy.  8 (2): 6-20

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